HEPA Nose Mask can capture airborne virus February 03 2022, 0 Comments

We use Silver ions sprayed on HEPA H11 for N95 HEPA Filter Nose Mask. 

Here are the article about the HEPA capturing the Airborne Virus:

 

Base on the Air purifiers with HEPA filtration efficiently capture particles the size of (and far smaller than) the virus that causes COVID-19, so the answer is yes. Furthermore, on October 5, 2020, the CDC changed its stance on how the virus is transmitted, and now says it “can be spread by exposure to virus in small droplets and particles that can linger in the air for minutes to hours.” In short, the CDC now acknowledges that the virus can spread via the air. That’s a major adjustment of its prior position: that direct person-to-person contact, including via larger respiratory droplets that do not travel far or linger in the air, was the main vector, and that airborne (a.k.a. aerosol) transmission was not a vector, period. Evidence for airborne transmission has been mounting since the spring; to catch up on the course this research has taken, read over University of Colorado-Boulder aerosols scientist Jose-Luis Jimenez’s summary in Time. And it’s worth noting that on September 18, the CDC published—and three days later retracted, citing errors in an internal review process—a version of its guideline that stated flatly that inhalation of aerosolized respiratory droplets “is thought to be the main way the virus spreads.”


Back to purifiers: The virus that causes COVID-19 is approximately 0.125 micron (125 nanometers) in diameter. It falls squarely within the particle-size range that HEPA filters capture with extraordinary efficiency: 0.01 micron (10 nanometers) and above. Many media outlets have incorrectly stated that HEPA filters don’t filter below 0.3 micron and therefore could not capture airborne coronaviruses. That’s wrong. This NASA study of HEPA filtration is quite technical, but the graph on page 7 and the preceding paragraph do a good job of explaining why HEPA filters are actually most efficient—almost 100% at 0.01 micron—at capturing ultrafine particles below the 0.3-micron HEPA test standard.
Photo: Sarah KobosThis means HEPA purifiers would efficiently capture viruses (and any aerosolized droplets of saliva and